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Escape from Cubicle Nation

I’ve not posted something like this before, so bear with me. This is about a site brought to my attention this very evening by none other than the very splendid Kathy Sierra:

If you’re thinking about ditching the corporate job and heading out on your own, you can’t do any better than to get help and inspiration from Pamela Slim’s Escape from Cubicle Nation blog.

And to anyone who feels like a “corporate prisoner”, or who has recently taken the leap and could use a gentle reminder of what this is about, I urge you to watch her movie, Declaration of Independence. It might be the most inspirational 3 minutes I’ve [sic] experienced in quite a while.

You can read more from Kathy, in context, here.

Now, on to the wee Flash movie she references. Well, I liked it. There, I said it. I grant you, it is somewhat cheesy—almost in the realm of those naff PowerPoint presentations well-meaning plonkers in the office send round from time-to-time—but it has some nice stock photos in it, and the quotes are actually damn good. Take, for example, this badger (often wrongly attributed to Goethe):

Until one is committed, there is hesitancy, the chance to draw back, always ineffectiveness. Concerning all acts of initiative (and creation), there is one elementary truth the ignorance of which kills countless ideas and splendid plans: that the moment one definitely commits oneself, the providence moves too. A whole stream of events issues from the decision, raising in one’s favour all manner of unforeseen incidents, meetings and material assistance, which no man could have dreamt would have come his way.

— William Hutchinson Murray, 1951.

So, mute your audio and check it out.

Comments

  1. A post by Evelyn Rodriguez, not unrelated:

    http://evelynrodriguez.typepad.com/crossroads_dispatches/2005/08/if_not_on_the_d.htmlBen Poole#

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I’m a software architect / developer / general IT wrangler specialising in web, mobile web and middleware using things like node.js, Java, C#, PHP, HTML5 and more.

Best described as a simpleton, but kindly. You can read more here.

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