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XSP ’blog

The inevitable has happened! Ed Wrenbeck has converted his site from Domino to XSP. It was bound to happen once he moved to the Trilog Group. Anyway, Ed’s kept the original look and feel, and comments are finally there! Cool. But crikey, those URLs are nearly as long as Websphere’s. ;-)

Comments

  1. Hi Ben,

    thanks for the reference. I do agree with you about the URL length, I remember all of the blogs that went around a few months ago that discussed extremely long URLs.

    I will try to justify them in a way that hopefully Domino folks can appreciate. One interesting thing about XSP is that a view or form isn't tied to a specific database. I can have a UI view which loads data from any database view I want. In the same way, I can have a form which loads a document from any database. Kind of like a single copy template, but even more isolated than that.

    The downside of this flexibility is that the URL start getting long when making such specifications.

    Ed.Ed Wrenbeck#
  2. ;-) Hi Ed. Only joshing you: the URL is clearly an “API” to the underlying data structure, much like Domino, and I think that’s eminently defensible, although others would disagree I’m sure. Websphere on the other hand… well, that’s just a mess eh!

    Further reading:
    Ned Batchelder: Apparently I’m evilBen Poole#
  3. When you say Websphere do you mean Websphere Portal Server? Those URLs are nasty, but they aren't really designed to be bookmarkable etc. With care you can make apps that run on Websphere with decent URLs.

    Which reminds me, I should get around to finishing up the first release of my regular expression based URL rewriting DSAPI plugin (basically the core functionality of mod_rewrite for Domino).Marcin#
  4. marcin,

    interesting comment about "not designed to be bookmarkable". is that really true? i looked at someone's implemenation of portal (actually the only live portal site i've seen, ever) - i found it via ed brill's site a while back, oh here it is

    http://www.edbrill.com/ebrill/edbrill.nsf/%20dx/02112004013251PMEBRPRL.htm

    i freely admit, these are the ugliest urls i have ever seen.

    http://portal.dotnsf.com/wps/portal/!ut/p/.cmd/cs/.ce/7_0_A/.s/7_0_29A/_th/J_0_9E/_s.7_0_A/7_0_VI/_s.7_0_A/7_0_29A

    i mean, my god… that is just awful. but you could bookmark it right? it isn't a frameset, which is of course a huge plus…

    is portal just too dynamic to be able to count on that url working later on? just curious, i haven't had the chance to really play with it yet. jonvon#
  5. Hmm… portals and book-marking. A tricky call. I would suggest that whilst usersmay not want to bookmark things - they have personalisation etc. to take care of that for them — they still want to send / forward links to others. Most portal technology — I’m not just focussing on Websphere here — simply doesn’t help with that.Ben Poole#
  6. with our intranet (a completely notes based, homegrown "portal"), our communications group often makes announcements about new online initiatives. they like to link to things directly (in the email announcment) when they can instead of making the user click through a bunch of stuff.

    i must say, i hadn't thought about this aspect of portal technology. it does bring a lot to the table, but this is a big check in the minus column in terms of usability. i wonder if it depends on the kind of resource. in other words, if it is a resource that is available to anyone, i wonder if the link could be static, or set up to be static in terms of the url. it would make sense that personalized content would be different for everyone…jonvon#

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